Fall 2016 Week 8 Update

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brown creeper

October 25th – November 3rd

First a thankyou!

Week 8 concludes our fall 2016 monitoring season and we would like to thank all of our wonderful volunteers who give up their early mornings to look for birds in our city.  They help us collect our data, transport birds to rehabilitation, and are a constant supply of information for new threats for birds within the city.  This project would not be what it is today or have acquired nearly as much data as we have without the endless help of our volunteers.

This week only 10 birds were found throughout the city (table 1.) .  The birds were also found spaced out throughout the week with only 1 or 2 birds being found on several of the days (table 2.).  This followed what was forecast by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology BirdCast as bird movement in the area began to slow around the end of last week (10/21) and through that weekend.  The warm weather that followed in the beginning to middle of the work week (10/25-10/27) continued to slow movement.   By the end of the week (10/28) movement began picking up again and more birds were found through the weekend and into this week. All of the birds were found within 3 routes with 3 birds being found outside of designated routes (table 3.).  Unfortunately only 2 of the 10 birds found were alive (table 4.)

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Table 1.) Total number of birds found between 10/25-11/3

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white-throated sparrow

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Table 2.) Number of birds found on each day from 10/25-11/3

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female northern cardinal

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Table 3.) Total number of birds found in each route between 10/25-11/3

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Table 4.) Number of dead versus live birds found from 10/25-11/3

Keep an eye on our website and our Facebook page for a summation of the fall 2016 monitoring season.  For information on how to get involved or volunteer, email birdsafepgh@gmail.com for more info.  Make sure to follow us on Instagram (@birdsafepgh) and Twitter (@birdsafePGH) as well!

Dead birds are taken to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and become specimens in the Section of Birds.

Live birds are transported to the Animal Rescue League’s Wildlife Center for rehabilitation and release.

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